baluster of a staircase

barandilla f

English-Spanish architecture and construction dictionary. 2013.

Mira otros diccionarios:

  • baluster — baluster, banister The OED describes banister as a corruption of the slightly earlier word baluster; both are 17c. A baluster, though once having the meaning that banisters (plural) now has, means a single curved or ornamental post supporting a… …   Modern English usage

  • baluster — [bal′əs tər] n. [Fr balustre < It balaustro, pillar < balausta, flower of the wild pomegranate < L balaustium < Gr balaustion: from some resemblance in shape] any of the small posts that support the upper rail of a railing, as on a… …   English World dictionary

  • Baluster — Bal us*ter, n. [F. balustre, It. balaustro, fr. L. balaustium the flower of the wild pomegranate, fr. Gr. balay stion; so named from the similarity of form.] (Arch.) A small column or pilaster, used as a support to the rail of an open parapet, to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • baluster — support for a railing, c.1600, from Fr. balustre, from It. balaustro pillar, from balausta flower of the wild pomegranate, from Gk. balaustion (perhaps of Semitic origin, Cf. Aramaic balatz flower of the wild pomegranate ). Staircase uprights had …   Etymology dictionary

  • Baluster — A baluster (according to OED derived through the French balustre , from Italian balaustro , from balaustra , pomegranate flower [from a resemblance to the swelling form of the half open flower ( illustration, below left )] , [The early sixteenth… …   Wikipedia

  • baluster — [17] Etymologically, baluster and banister are the same word. Both come ultimately from Greek balāustion ‘pomegranate flower’, which reached English via Latin balaustium, Italian balaustro, and French balustre. The reason for the application of… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • baluster — [17] Etymologically, baluster and banister are the same word. Both come ultimately from Greek balāustion ‘pomegranate flower’, which reached English via Latin balaustium, Italian balaustro, and French balustre. The reason for the application of… …   Word origins

  • banister — baluster, banister The OED describes banister as a corruption of the slightly earlier word baluster; both are 17c. A baluster, though once having the meaning that banisters (plural) now has, means a single curved or ornamental post supporting a… …   Modern English usage

  • banister — Baluster Bal us*ter, n. [F. balustre, It. balaustro, fr. L. balaustium the flower of the wild pomegranate, fr. Gr. balay stion; so named from the similarity of form.] (Arch.) A small column or pilaster, used as a support to the rail of an open… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stairway — Stairs redirects here. For other uses, see Stairs (disambiguation). Staircase redirects here. For other uses, see Staircase (disambiguation). This article is about the construction. For the song by Led Zeppelin, see Stairway to Heaven. Stairways… …   Wikipedia

  • Mohatta Palace — after renovation …   Wikipedia

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